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Microscopic flow visualization: making the world on your microchip visible

Steve Wereley, Professor of Mechanical Engineering
Purdue University

时间:4 p.m., Nov. 6, 2017(周一)
地点:TBA
联系人:许超,cxu@zju.edu.cn

Abstract:
Fluid flow in the micro and nanoscale world of Lab-on-Chip devices can behave very unusually.  It is essential to have precise experimental tools to see what is happening at these very small length scales. Unfortunately these small length scales also prove challenging for experimental tools. This seminar will explore the tools available for viewing (microscale flow visualization) and measuring (micro-PIV) such small flows.  Numerous examples will be presented in which microscale flows are visualized and measured.  These examples range from flows in Lab-on-Chip devices, in and around mechanical devices, and around biological organisms. In many situations 2D planar measurements are sufficient but in some situations, 3D measurements are required. Several ways of measuring flows in 3D will be discussed.  Furthermore, beyond the fluid’s velocity field, other flow quantities of interest are often needed, such as temperature and pressure.  Methods for imaging or measuring these important scalar fields will also be discussed.

Bio:

Professor Wereley completed his masters and doctoral research at Northwestern University. He joined the Purdue University faculty in August of 1999 after a two-year postdoctoral appointment at the University of California Santa Barbara. During his time at UCSB he worked with a group developing, patenting, and licensing to TSI, Inc., the micro-Particle Image Velocimetry technique. His current research interests include opto/electrokinetics, investigating microscopic biological flows, harnessing diffusion for sensing applications, and developing new ways of measuring flows at the smallest length scales. Professor Wereley is the co-author of Fundamentals and Applications of Microfluidics (Artech House, 2002 and 2006) and Particle Image Velocimetry: A Practical Guide (Springer, 2007). He is on the editorial board of Experiments in Fluids and is an Associate Editor of Springer’s Microfluidics and Nanofluidics. Professor Wereley has edited Springer’s recent Encyclopedia of Microfluidics and Nanofluidics and Kluwer’s BioMEMS and Biomedical Nanotechnology.