Security in Cyber-Physical Systems: A Control Systems Perspective


Title: Security in Cyber-Physical Systems: A Control Systems Perspective

演讲人:Prof. Petros Voulgaris, UIUC, Fellow of IEEE

  • 浙江大学玉泉校区工控新楼105教室
  • 时间:2018年10月26日(星期五)下午3点

Abstract:

Cyber-physical systems (CPS) have become ubiquitous in engineering and have extended the range of aerospace applications to several new domains. Unmanned Arial Vehicles (UAV) are typical examples of CPS that can execute cooperative missions of increasing complexity without constant supervision of human operators e.g., military reconnaissance and strike operations, border patrol missions, forest fire detection, police surveillance, and recovery operations to name a few. Similarly, current and future space applications such as satellite swarms and distributed spacecraft systems, autonomous and aerospace robotic systems, depend critically on the synergy of cyberspace with the physical components.

Pertinent to CPS is the notion of security, which is of paramount importance in aerospace, power, transportation, manufacturing, etc. The concept of security to malicious attacks brings an important new dimension in the design CPS.  In this talk, we present some aspects of this problem related to control system security to attacks and provide some ways to enhance detection and awareness. More specifically, we elaborate on this issue from the control analysis, design and actual implementation point of view. We consider malicious attacks on actuators and sensors of a feedback system which can be modelled as additive, possibly unbounded, disturbances at the digital (cyber) part of the feedback loop. It is shown that the standard sampled data implementation can create additional vulnerabilities to stealthy attacks, and therefore, when security is at stake, it is of paramount importance to have methods to eliminate these vulnerabilities. By devising a multi-rate scheme we can guarantee that stealthy attacks are not possible.  Further, we can provide precise trade-offs on performance and safety cost. Finally, we touch upon other type of attacks and their connections to switching systems and linear programming.

Short Bio:

Professor Petros G. Voulgaris received the Diploma in Mechanical Engineering from the National Technical University, Athens, Greece, in 1986, and the S.M. and Ph.D. degrees in Aeronautics and Astronautics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1988 and 1991, respectively.  Since 1991, he has been with the Department of Aerospace Engineering, University of Illinois where he is currently a Professor (also appointments with the Coordinated Science Laboratory, and the department of Electrical and Computer Engineering.)  His research interests include optimal, robust and distributed control and estimation; networked control; applications of advanced control methods to engineering practice including, power systems, air-vehicle, nano-scale, robotic, and structural control systems.  Dr. Voulgaris is a recipient of several awards including the NSF Research Initiation Award, the ONR Young Investigator Award and the UIUC Xerox Award for research.  He has also been a Visiting ADGAS Chair Professor, Mechanical Engineering, Petroleum Institute, Abu Dhabi, UAE (2008-10).  His research has been supported by several agencies including NSF, ONR, AFOSR, NASA, and Boeing totalling more than $12 million of funded projects.  He is also a Fellow of IEEE.


From MIPS to Vicsek: A comprehensive phase diagram for self-propelled rods


From MIPS to Vicsek: A comprehensive phase diagram for self-propelled rods
Xiaqing Shi – Center for soft condensed matter physics and interdisciplinary research, Soochow University

2017年12月22日,下午1点,工控新楼211
Self-propelled rods interacting by volume exclusion is one of the simplest active matter systems. Despite years of effort, no comprehensive picture of their phase diagram is available. Furthermore, results on explicit rods are so far largely disconnected from those obtained on the relatively better understood cases of motility induced phase separation (MIPS) of (usually) isotropic active particles, and from our current knowledge of Vicsek-style aligning point particles. In this talk, I will present a complete phase diagram of a generic model of self-propelled rods and show how it is connected to both MIPS and Vicsek worlds.

施夏清副教授长期从事活性物质/自驱动体系的理论研究。目前,关于细胞集体动力学、细胞骨架自组织及活性粒子拓扑缺陷动力学等研究工作已发表在《Nature》、《PNAS》、《Nature Communication》等高水平学术期刊,相关工作长期以来得到了国家自然科学基金以及苏州大学软凝聚态物理及交叉研究中心平台的大力支持。


A mini-course on Particle Image Velocimetry


普渡大学Steven T. Wereley教授的PIV短期课程

资料和参考教材:
Particle Image VelocimetryA Practical Guide
Authors: Raffel, M., Willert, C.E., Wereley, S., Kompenhans, J.
http://www.springer.com/gp/book/9783540723073?cm_mmc=sgw-_-ps-_-book-_-978-3-540-72307-3

时间:下午4点 – 6点,Nov. 9, 10, 13 and 14.
地点:TBA
联系人:许超

Thu – Lecture 1 (two hours)

  1. Introduction
  2. Tracer particles, illumination
  3. Particle imaging

Fri – Lecture 2 (two hours) Fri

  1. Statistics of PIV
  2. Recording techniques

Mon – Lecture 3 (two hours)

  1. Eval Techniques I, corr, peak fitting
  2. Eval Techniques II, corr tracking, padding
  3. Eval Techniques III, corr avg, CDIC

Tue – Lecture 4 (two hours)

  1. Image processing, particle ident, part tracking
  2. Data validation, correction, statistics
  3. Resolution, uncertainty
  4. Advanced Topics, stereo, holo, temp

Bio:

Professor Wereley completed his masters and doctoral research at Northwestern University. He joined the Purdue University faculty in August of 1999 after a two-year postdoctoral appointment at the University of California Santa Barbara. During his time at UCSB he worked with a group developing, patenting, and licensing to TSI, Inc., the micro-Particle Image Velocimetry technique. His current research interests include opto/electrokinetics, investigating microscopic biological flows, harnessing diffusion for sensing applications, and developing new ways of measuring flows at the smallest length scales. Professor Wereley is the co-author of Fundamentals and Applications of Microfluidics (Artech House, 2002 and 2006) and Particle Image Velocimetry: A Practical Guide (Springer, 2007). He is on the editorial board of Experiments in Fluids and is an Associate Editor of Springer’s Microfluidics and Nanofluidics. Professor Wereley has edited Springer’s recent Encyclopedia of Microfluidics and Nanofluidics and Kluwer’s BioMEMS and Biomedical Nanotechnology.


Microscopic flow visualization: making the world on your microchip visible


Steve Wereley, Professor of Mechanical Engineering
Purdue University

时间:4 p.m., Nov. 6, 2017(周一)
地点:TBA
联系人:许超,cxu@zju.edu.cn

Abstract:
Fluid flow in the micro and nanoscale world of Lab-on-Chip devices can behave very unusually.  It is essential to have precise experimental tools to see what is happening at these very small length scales. Unfortunately these small length scales also prove challenging for experimental tools. This seminar will explore the tools available for viewing (microscale flow visualization) and measuring (micro-PIV) such small flows.  Numerous examples will be presented in which microscale flows are visualized and measured.  These examples range from flows in Lab-on-Chip devices, in and around mechanical devices, and around biological organisms. In many situations 2D planar measurements are sufficient but in some situations, 3D measurements are required. Several ways of measuring flows in 3D will be discussed.  Furthermore, beyond the fluid’s velocity field, other flow quantities of interest are often needed, such as temperature and pressure.  Methods for imaging or measuring these important scalar fields will also be discussed.

Bio:

Professor Wereley completed his masters and doctoral research at Northwestern University. He joined the Purdue University faculty in August of 1999 after a two-year postdoctoral appointment at the University of California Santa Barbara. During his time at UCSB he worked with a group developing, patenting, and licensing to TSI, Inc., the micro-Particle Image Velocimetry technique. His current research interests include opto/electrokinetics, investigating microscopic biological flows, harnessing diffusion for sensing applications, and developing new ways of measuring flows at the smallest length scales. Professor Wereley is the co-author of Fundamentals and Applications of Microfluidics (Artech House, 2002 and 2006) and Particle Image Velocimetry: A Practical Guide (Springer, 2007). He is on the editorial board of Experiments in Fluids and is an Associate Editor of Springer’s Microfluidics and Nanofluidics. Professor Wereley has edited Springer’s recent Encyclopedia of Microfluidics and Nanofluidics and Kluwer’s BioMEMS and Biomedical Nanotechnology.